Port Authority Bus Terminal Map

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116 Route: Time Schedules, Stops & Maps - Perth Amboy

Administrative Offices 345 Sixth Ave, third Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.566.5500 Downtown Service Center 623 Smithfield Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222Find Information on the entire Port Authority NY NJ Bus Terminals, Connections and Maps, Traffic and Volume InformationARCGIS device map. Administrative Offices 345 Sixth Ave, 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.566.5500Rome2rio makes travelling from Port Authority Bus Terminal to Monticello easy. Rome2rio is a door-to-door commute information and booking engine, helping you get to and from any location on the earth. Find the entire shipping options on your go back and forth from Port Authority Bus Terminal to Monticello right right here.

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Port Authority Bus Terminal to Warwick - 2 ways to travel

The Port Authority Bus Terminal (colloquially known as Port Authority and by way of its acronym PABT) is a bus terminal serving interstate buses traveling into Manhattan, New York City.The terminal is the biggest in the Western Hemisphere and the busiest on the earth by way of volume of site visitors, serving about 8,000 buses and 225,000 other folks on an average weekday and more than 65 million other people a yr.Copyright 2021 Port Authority of Allegheny County Terms of Use/Legal Contact Us PAAC Home PageTimes Square-Forty second Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal is a New York City Subway station advanced situated beneath Times Square and the Port Authority Bus Terminal, on the intersection of 42nd Street, Seventh and Eighth Avenues, and Broadway in Midtown Manhattan.The complicated permits free transfers between the IRT 42nd Street Shuttle, the BMT Broadway Line, the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line andRome2rio makes travelling from Port Authority Bus Terminal to Willowbrook Mall simple. Rome2rio is a door-to-door shuttle data and reserving engine, serving to you get to and from any location on the earth. Find all of the transport choices to your travel from Port Authority Bus Terminal to Willowbrook Mall proper here.Port Authority Bus Terminal is positioned between fortieth and 42nd Streets and eighth and ninth Avenues. There are entrances to Port Authority Bus Terminal from various points on 40th Street, forty second Street, eighth Avenue, and ninth Avenue. Subway to Port Authority Bus Terminal: A/C/E to 42th Street/Port Authority

Port Authority Bus Terminal

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Port Authority Bus TerminalEighth Avenue and West forty second Street, and the sector's largest LED mediamesh facadeLocation625 8th AvenueNew York, NYUnited StatesCoordinates40°45′24″N 73°59′28″W / 40.75667°N 73.99111°WCoordinates: 40°45′24″N 73°59′28″W / 40.75667°N 73.99111°WOwned by means ofPort Authority of New York and New JerseyPlatforms223 gatesConnectionsNew York City Subway:​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ at Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus TerminalNew York City Bus: M11, M20, M34A SBS, M42, M104, SIM8, SIM8X, SIM22, SIM25, SIM26, SIM30New Jersey Transit Bus: 107, 108, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 119, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 144, 145, 148, 151, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 177, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 308, 319, 320, 321, 324, 353ConstructionPlatform levels9[1]Parking1250 areasOther knowledgeWebsitePABTHistoryOpenedDecember 15, 1950Rebuilt1963 (parking decks)1979 (annex)2007 (seismic retrofit)Location

The Port Authority Bus Terminal (colloquially known as Port Authority and by means of its acronym PABT) is a bus terminal serving interstate buses touring into Manhattan, New York City. The terminal is the biggest in the Western Hemisphere and the busiest on the earth by means of volume of visitors,[2] serving about 8,000 buses and 225,000 other folks on a mean weekday and greater than 65 million other folks a yr.[3]

The terminal is positioned in Midtown at 625 Eighth Avenue between fortieth Street and 42nd Street, one block east of the Lincoln Tunnel and one block west of Times Square. It is one in all 3 bus terminals operated through the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ), the others being the George Washington Bridge Bus Station in Upper Manhattan and the Journal Square Transportation Center in Jersey City.

The PABT serves as a terminus and departure level for commuter routes in addition to for long-distance intercity bus carrier and is a significant transit hub for residents of New Jersey. It has 223 departure gates and 1,250 car parking spaces, in addition to business and retail space.[4] In 2011, there have been more than 2.263 million bus departures from the terminal.[5]

The PABT, opened in 1950 between Eighth and Ninth Avenues and fortieth and forty first Streets, was constructed to consolidate the many other private terminals spread throughout Midtown Manhattan. A 2nd wing, extending to forty second Street, was added in 1979. Since then, the terminal has reached peak hour capacity, resulting in congestion and overflow on local streets. It does not permit for layover parking; hence, buses are required to make use of local streets or a lot, or go back in the course of the tunnel empty. The PANYNJ has been unsuccessful in its makes an attempt to increase passenger facilities by way of public deepest partnership, and in 2011 it delayed building of a bus depot annex, bringing up budgetary constraints. In June 2013, it commissioned an 18-month find out about that would imagine options for reconfiguration, expansion, and substitute of the terminal.[6]

History

Site The last of many bus terminals in Midtown, at Old Penn Station. In 1963, Greyhound become the last company to transport to the PABT.

Before the PABT used to be constructed, there have been a number of terminals scattered all through Midtown Manhattan,[7] a few of that have been a part of resorts. The Federal Writers Project's 1940 publication of New York: A Guide to the Empire State lists the All American Bus Depot on West 42nd, the Consolidated Bus Terminal on West 41st, and the Hotel Astor Bus Terminal on West 45th.[8] The Dixie Bus Center on 42nd Street, situated at the floor flooring of the resort of the similar identify, opened in 1930 and operated till 1959.[9] The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad had coach service aboard a ferry to Communipaw Terminal in Jersey City that ran from an elegant bus terminal with a revolving bus platform in the Chanin Building at forty second and Lexington.[7]Greyhound Lines had its own facility adjacent to Pennsylvania Station and did not transfer into the PABT till 1963, at which era all long-distance bus carrier to the town was consolidated at the terminal.[7][10]

The Lincoln Tunnel from Manhattan to New Jersey had opened in 1937. Within a year and a half of the tunnel's opening, five companies have been operating 600 interstate bus journeys through the tunnel on a daily basis.[11] The city opposed letting buses undergo Midtown Manhattan since the buses led to congestion.[12] A big bus terminal near the mouth of Lincoln Tunnel was first mandated in December 1939, after town introduced that it could ban commuter buses from driving into congested parts of Midtown. The ban used to be supposed to go into effect in January 1941.[13] In July 1940, at the request of New York City mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia, the Port Authority began undertaking a survey into the causes and effects of intercity and commuter bus site visitors in Manhattan.[14] That December, Times Square Terminal Inc. filed an utility to build and perform a commuter bus terminal from 41st to 42nd Streets between Eighth and Ninth Avenues, adjoining to the McGraw-Hill Building on land owned by way of the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company. According to projections on the time, the $Four million terminal could be finished within nine months.[15] Manhattan Borough President Stanley M. Isaacs proposed building a brief 0,000 tube between the Lincoln Tunnel and the new terminal.[16] The city authorized the construction of the new terminal and connecting tunnel in January 1941.[17] Meanwhile, New York Supreme Court Justice John E. McGeehan blocked La Guardia's proposed bus ban on the grounds that it was unreasonable.[18]

Plans for a bus terminal had been behind schedule because of World War II, which used the assets supposed for many tasks that have been indirectly involved within the conflict effort. In June 1944, the New York state govt allotted 0,000 to the Port Authority for finding out the feasibility of constructing a bus terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[19] Early the next year, plans for a mid-Manhattan bus terminal have been introduced to the other bus companies.[20] While maximum major bus strains agreed to the plan, Greyhound did not, for it was once already making plans on increasing its then terminal close to Penn Station.[21]

The New York City Board of Estimate approved the development of the new terminal in January 1947. It used to be to be constructed one block south of the aborted Times Square Terminal Inc. web site, at the block bounded through fortieth and forty first Streets and Eighth and Ninth Avenues.[22] Plans for the structural design have been revised considerably in March 1948, when the Port Authority added a 500-spot car parking zone for cars atop the terminal's roof, to be accessed via a sequence of ramps.[23] The last commercial tenant on the long run terminal's site moved away the next month,[24] and the Port Authority hosted a groundbreaking ceremony for the terminal in January 1949.[25]

Original development and additions There are ramps to the Lincoln Tunnel, while the decrease level of the North Wing connects with a tunnel beneath Ninth Avenue

The authentic Mid-Manhattan Bus Terminal (now the PABT's South Wing), constructed in the International Style, was opened on December 15, 1950, as a generic "Port Authority bus terminal".[26] A vertical addition of three parking levels, able to deal with 1,000 automobiles, used to be finished in 1963.[27] In 2007, the South Wing underwent a seismic retrofit in a million building code-compliance challenge to reinforce and stabilize it against earthquakes.[28]

Plans to enlarge the bus station to 42nd Street had been floated as early as 1965.[29] The North Wing was once opened in 1979.[30] This expansion greater capability via 50 %, and created a brand new façade comprising 27 metal X-shaped trusses.[27][31] Assessing this façade design, Virtualtourist indexed the PABT in 2008 as some of the "World's Top 10 Ugliest Buildings and Monuments".[32]

In the overdue Seventies and early Eighties, the world in and around the PABT used to be thought to be unhealthy by way of police, vacationers, and commuters due to prime crime, prostitution, vagrant conduct, and inadequate maintenance and law enforcement within the building and nearby Times Square, especially after darkish, but this is now not the case. During 1997, the terminal used to be the subject of a find out about, coordinated through Professor Marcus Felson of Rutgers University, which recognized strategic adjustments to the building's design and space supervision with the intention to decreasing crime and other issues.[1]

Expansion proposals Air rights

The PANYNJ has attempted to additional make bigger the terminal by way of public–private partnerships via leasing air rights over the North Wing.

In 1999, a 35-story development, to be referred to as 7 Times Square, was proposed to be built over the North Wing and a golfing driving vary used to be to be constructed over the South Wing.[33] However, the mission was once put on grasp in 2001 because of a decline in the economic system following the dot com bust.[34]

Between 2000 and 2011, the PANYNJ labored with Vornado Realty Trust, which had partnered with the Lawrence Ruben Company.[35] In November 2007, the PANYNJ introduced the terms of an agreement through which it could obtain nearly 0 million in a rent association for a brand new place of job tower that may additionally supply funds for additional terminal amenities.[36] It would come with 1.3 million sq. ft (120,000 m2) of commercial house in a new place of business tower, which used to be to make use of the vanity address 20 Times Square, the addition of 60,000 square feet (5,600 m2) of recent retail space in the bus terminal, in addition to 18 additional departure gates, accommodating 70 additional buses wearing as much as 3,000 passengers in step with hour. New escalators can be put in to lend a hand move passengers extra quickly between the gate area and the ground floor. Construction was once anticipated to start in 2009 or 2010, and take four years to complete.[37][38] After an architectural pageant, the PANYNJ selected the design by means of Pritzker Prize-winning architect Richard Rogers from Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners for a 45-story place of job tower with an general height of 855 feet (261 m).[39][40][41] The settlement expired in August 2009,[42] and in May 2010, Vornado was given a retroactive extension on the cut-off date to August 2011.[43] In July 2011, Vornado introduced that they had discovered a brand new partner to partially finance the tower,[35] however in November 2011, the new backers pulled out of the project.[44]

In June 2014, the PANYNJ won the next worth than anticipated for the sale of within sight property, $One hundred fifteen million as opposed to $A hundred million. The worth of air rights above the terminal could be upper than previously appraised, due to emerging belongings values in the house surrounding the terminal and an indication of the rising worth air rights above the terminal.[45] The company had intentions to unlock a request for proposals for air-rights building in 2014–2015.[46]

West Side bus depot Many buses lay over on metropolis streets or make non-passenger bus journeys throughout the Lincoln Tunnel for daytime parking

The Port Authority allows for limited layovers of buses, thus requiring companies to make different preparations all through off-peak hours and between trips. Many park on local streets or parking a lot right through the day, whilst others make a round-trip without passengers in the course of the Lincoln Tunnel to use layover amenities in New Jersey.[47] Bus layover parking on metropolis streets is regulated via the NYDOT, which assigns places right through town. In the vicinity of the PABT, these are concentrated at the side streets between Ninth and Twelfth Avenues from 30th Street to sixtieth Street.[48]

Various studies and news studies have concluded that there is a need for a brand new bus depot in Midtown.[49][50][51][52] In a joint learn about by way of New York City and PANYNJ, it was once decided that a preferred location for a bus depot was at Galvin Plaza positioned on thirty ninth to 40th Streets between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues. However, this proposed location for commuter buses shouldn't have capacity for charter buses and tour buses.[49]

The PANYNJ introduced considerable toll will increase on its crossings between New York and New Jersey in August 2011, mentioning as one in all their causes the construction of an 0 million "new bus garage connected to the Port Authority Bus Terminal, which will serve as a traffic reliever to the Lincoln Tunnel and midtown Manhattan streets, saving two-thirds of the empty bus trips that must make two extra trips through the tunnel each day."[53] Originally incorporated in the PANYNJ 2007–2016 Capital Plan,[54] development of the storage was scrapped by means of the agency in October 2011, after it cited budgetary constraints because of an association wherein the toll increases can be incrementally implemented.[47]

In April 2012, the director of the PANYNJ reported that a proposal had been made through developer Larry Silverstein, who has a memorandum of figuring out to expand a property at thirty ninth Street and Dyer Avenue close to the ramps between the tunnel and the terminal, to construct a bus storage with a residential tower above it.[55][56] This parcel isn't large enough to house bus ramps and would require the usage of elevators, which gave the look to be a brand new type of application for bus garage.[57] The proposal has now not advanced to any extent further.

In 2014, the PANYNJ made an application for a 0 million grant to the Federal Transit Administration for development of the storage.[46]

Replacement proposals

In June 2013, the PANYNJ commissioned an 18-month learn about that was once to imagine reconfiguration, growth, and substitute options for the PABT and new bus staging and garage facilities on Manhattan's West Side.[3] The .5 million contract awarded to Kohn Pedersen Fox and Parsons Brinkerhoff would look into doable public-private financing, including the sale of air rights and cost-sharing with deepest bus carriers.[6][58][59]

In 2016, the PANYNJ invited a number of construction groups to suggest concepts for substitute of the present bus terminal.[60] Subsequently, in May 2019, the PANYNJ commenced the environmental assessment process for the PABT's alternative. The PANYNJ deliberate to host 4 public hearings, two each and every in New York and New Jersey, in July and September 2019.[61][62] Three plans had been considered: development a new terminal on the web page, construction a brand new terminal somewhere else, or shifting intercity buses elsewhere whilst renovations happened in the current terminal.[63]

In anticipation of opportunities that reconstruction of the bus terminal will portend, the Hell's Kitchen South Coalition produced its own plan for the world.[64]

In January 2021, the Port Authority launched plans for reconstructing the terminal on the same web site, with growth of bus layover facilities.[65]

Art and promoting

George Rhoads's 1983 rolling ball sculpture forty second Street Ballroom

The Commuters, a sculpture of 3 weary bus passengers and a clock salvaged from the unique terminal by way of George Segal, was unveiled in the primary ticket house in 1982.[66]42nd Street Ballroom, a rolling ball sculpture via George Rhoads on the major ground of the North Wing, used to be installed in 1983.[67] A statue of Jackie Gleason within the guise of one in every of his most famous characters, the bus motive force Ralph Kramden, stands in entrance of the primary entrance to the original South Wing. The plaque reads, "Jackie Gleason as Ralph Kramden - Bus Driver - Raccoon Lodge Treasurer - Dreamer - Presented by the People of TV Land".[68]

Triple Bridge Gateway, completed in 2009, is an art set up by means of Leni Schwendinger Light Projects, underneath the ramps connecting the tunnel and the terminal; it is a part of the transformation of the Ninth Avenue front of the South Wing.[69][70][71]

In July 2011, the PABT became home to the sector's greatest mediamesh, a stainless steel fabric embedded with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for various sorts of media, artwork, and promoting imagery. The LED imagery façade covers 6,000 sq. toes, and wraps across the nook of forty second Street and Eighth Avenue.[72][73]

Configuration

Information and ticketing

For many years there was no timetable board showing departures at the PABT; passengers have been required to inquire at information cubicles or ticket counters for schedules and departure gates. In 2015, each the Port Authority and NJ Transit put in displays list upcoming scheduled departures, despite the fact that buses aren't tracked so delays are not communicated by way of this system.

Tickets can be bought at the main degree (ground ground) of the South Wing on the major ticket plaza; Greyhound, Trailways and Short Line have further price ticket counters in the terminal.

New Jersey Transit (NJT) maintains a customer service counter at the terminal at the south wing primary degree (open weekdays).[74] NJT has ticket vending machines (TVM) all over the terminal. Effective in 2009, passengers boarding NJT buses are required to buy a price tag prior to boarding.[75] In April 2012, NJT began re-equipping machines that would give change for those paying cash with bills relatively than 1 cash.[76] NJT additionally accepts contactless payment programs (such as Apple Pay and Google Pay) at TVMs, NJT's cellular app, and price ticket windows.[77]

Gates Escalators and stairs elevate passengers to in my view enclosed pull-through island platforms at departure gates numbered Two hundred and up.

There are 223 departure gates of either saw-tooth (pull-in) or island platform (pull-through) design at PABT.[1] At the Subway Level, or lower level of each wings, Gates 1-Eighty five are predominantly used for long-distance go back and forth and jitneys, and overnight hours (1 a.m. to six a.m.) for commuter strains. From 6 a.m. to at least one a.m., during the hours of normal operation, Gates 200–425, numbered to signify the different boarding areas (100, 200, 300, and so forth.) throughout the complicated are obtainable from the 2nd ground and serve short-haul commuter lines.[78] Most NJ Transit routes and New Jersey inner most carrier commuter routes are at the 200, 300, and Four hundred levels.

Retail and leisure

Like different transit hubs, the PABT has gone through a chain of renovations to create a mall-like sphere to promote its retail, food, entertainment, and services spaces.[79][80] There are a large number of franchise retail outlets, comparable to Heartland Brewery, Au Bon Pain, Jamba Juice, Starbucks, Hudson News, Duane Reade, GNC, plus a United States Postal Service branch station, as well as a number of restaurants and bars all the way through the terminal.[81] Frames, a bowling alley (previously lengthy referred to as Leisure Time Bowling) occupies a big space at the 2d ground.[82][83]

Restrooms

Men's and ladies's restrooms within the bus terminal have been the subject of media consideration; the women's restroom on the second one floor is the terminal's busiest. It acts as a make-up counter, frequented by means of crowds day-to-day because of its lighting, massive mirrors, and cleanliness, a noted contrast to the rest of the unpopular terminal.[84]

The males's restrooms are the subject of an ongoing lawsuit in opposition to the Port Authority's police department. The lawsuit uncovered a trend of plainclothes officials concentrated on gay or effeminate males at the bus terminal's restrooms. Five officers, of about 1,700 within the department, have been chargeable for 70 p.c of public lewdness arrests in 2014, the year the lawsuit was once filed. Most of the arrests were for masturbation; the lawsuit alleged many of the arrests are focused at LGBT males who've now not performed any wrongful acts.[85][86]

Companies

Port Authority is served through the next traces:[87]

Commuter lines Academy Bus Coach USA Community Coach Olympia Trails Rockland Coaches Short Line Suburban Trails Community Lines[88] DeCamp Bus Lines Lakeland Bus Lines Martz Trailways[89] New Jersey Transit (Routes 107-199)[note 1] OurBus Spanish Transportation Trans-Bridge Lines Airport buses New York Airport Service to Kennedy Airport and LaGuardia Airport[91][92] Olympia Trails to Newark Airport[93]Intercity operators Gates 1-Eighty five on the lower level of the terminal are used for inter-city departures. Adirondack Trailways Bolt Bus C&J Coach Company Fullington Trailways Greyhound Lines Megabus OurBus Prime Peter Pan Bus LinesSightseeing Gray Line New York The RIDE,[94] close by at the north facet of forty second Street and Eighth Avenue

Connecting delivery

Subway front and cab stand on Eighth Avenue. Extensive underground passageways attach various stations & PABT.

Direct underground passageways attach the terminal with the 1, ​2, ​3​, 7, <7>​​, ​A​, ​C​, ​E​, N, ​Q, ​R, ​W​, and S trains of the New York City Subway on the Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal station advanced.

Several bus routes operated through New York City Bus, including the M11, M20, M34A, M42 and M104 local buses and the SIM8, SIM8X, SIM22, SIM25, SIM26 and SIM30 Staten Island specific buses, stop instantly outside the terminal.[95][96]

In the decade, a large number of jitney routes serving Hudson and Passaic counties in northern New Jersey select up passengers within the bus terminal or in the street out of doors the terminal. Dollar vans operated by way of Spanish Transportation to Paterson and Community Lines jitneys to Journal Square use platforms on the decrease level.[97] Routes to Bergenline Avenue/GWB Plaza, and Boulevard East leave from forty second Street out of doors the bus terminal's North Wing.[98][99][100][101][102][103]

In 2011, an argument arose when Megabus, a long-distance provider the usage of double-decker buses, with the permission of the New York City Department of Transportation, started to make use of the streets and sidewalk at the terminal. The director of the PANYNJ, bringing up safety, as well as different long-haul firms (which paid hire to use the terminal) mentioning unfair competitive advantage, were opposed to the permission to allow the company use of forty first Street directly beneath the relationship between the 2 wings of the Port Authority.[104] Despite those concerns and court cases, Megabus was once first of all authorised to stick.[105] However, the permission used to be withdrawn later that year.[106] Megabus now in large part makes use of street-side stops near the Javits Center (for pickup) and Penn Station (for drop-off), except for for a restricted collection of routes which use the PABT.[107]

Capacity and overflow

The XBL, or unique bus lane, on Lincoln Tunnel Helix amid AM rush hour, leads to the PABT.

The PABT is the gateway for many bus and jitney traffic entering Manhattan[108] with more than 190,000 passengers[4] on 6,000 bus journeys made through the Lincoln Tunnel and terminal daily.[109] The Lincoln Tunnel Approach and Helix (Route 495) in Hudson County, New Jersey passes through a minimize and descends the Hudson Palisades to the Lincoln Tunnel at the different end of which is the PABT.[110] Starting in 1964, research were performed to handle the feasibility of an exclusive bus lane (XBL) right through the weekday morning top duration.[111] The XBL, first carried out in 1970, serves weekday eastbound bus visitors between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m.[112] The lane is fed through the New Jersey Turnpike at Exits 16E and 17 and New Jersey Route 3. The helix, tunnel, and terminal are owned and operated by means of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ), the bi-state agency that also implements the two.5-mile (4.02 km) contraflow categorical bus left lane in 3 westbound lanes. The XBL serves over 1,800 buses and 65,000 bus commuters on common weekday mornings and is a major component of the morning "inbound" commutation crossing the Hudson River.[112][113][114][115][116] Over 100 bus carriers make the most of the Exclusive Bus Lane.[112] As of 2013, New Jersey Transit operates fifty-seven interstate bus routes through the Lincoln Tunnel, as do a large number of regional and long-distance corporations.[6]

Despite the XBL to the tunnel, there are often long delays because of congestion led to through the limited capacity of bus lanes for deboarding passengers on the bus terminal, which has reached its capability.[117] leading to re-routing and overflow on native streets[117][118] In December 2011, the New Jersey Assembly handed a solution calling upon the PANYNJ to address the issue of congestion.[109] Congestion contributed to a decline of the on-time efficiency of buses, which was once Ninety two percent in 2012 and 85 p.c within the first quarter of 2014.[90]Thomas Duane, representing New York's twenty ninth Senate District which contains the realm across the PABT, has also known as for decreased congestion in the neighborhood.[119][120] A consortium of regional transportation advocates, the Tri-State Transportation Campaign, have proposed a reconfiguration and expansion of the terminal, a PM westbound XBL, bus stops at different Manhattan places, and a new bus storage depot.[120] A proposed bus storage in Midtown, in order that daylight hours turnover buses could steer clear of unnecessarily touring through the tunnel with out passengers, was once scrapped via the company in October 2011.[47][121][122] In May 2012, the commissioner of NJDOT suggested that some NJ Transit routes may originate/terminate at different Manhattan locations, notably the East Side; an arrangement requiring approval of the NYC Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) to make use of bus stops.[123]

Notes

^ NJT bus operations make up 70 p.c of the terminal’s traffic. Approximately 79,000 NJT riders and every other 30,000 commuters on inner most bus lines use the terminal each and every morning, strolling back from New Jersey, Rockland County and Orange County in the Hudson Highlands and eastern Pennsylvania.[90]

References

^ a b c .mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .quotation qquotes:"\"""\"""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground:linear-gradient(clear,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")appropriate 0.1em heart/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .quotation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .quotation .cs1-lock-registration abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")appropriate 0.1em heart/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground:linear-gradient(clear,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")correct 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolour:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:assist.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground:linear-gradient(clear,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")correct 0.1em center/12px no-repeat.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolour:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inheritFelson, Marcus; et al. 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