Describing Motion Graphically

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Describing Motion Verbally with Speed and Velocity

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Describing Motion Verbally with Speed and Velocity

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Describing Motion

Describing Motion

Describing Motion

Michael Fowler

University of Virginia

Index of Lectures and Overview of the CourseLink to Previous Lecture

Uniform motion in a instantly line

Let us consider first the easy case of a automobile transferring at a steady velocity down a immediately street. Once now we have agreed at the gadgets we are using to measure speed---such as miles in line with hour or meters in keeping with moment, or whatever---a simple quantity, comparable to 55 (mph), tells us all there is to mention in describing steady velocity motion. Well, in reality, this isn't rather all---it doesn't let us know which approach (east or west, say) the automobile is shifting. For some purposes, corresponding to figuring gasoline consumption, that is inappropriate, but if the purpose of the commute is to get somewhere, versus just driving round, it turns out to be useful to grasp the course as well as the rate.

To convey the course in addition to the rate, physicists make a difference between two phrases that mean the similar thing in everyday lifestyles: speed and velocity.

Speed, in physics jargon, keeps its atypical meaning---it is just a measure of ways fast something's transferring, and provides no clue about which path it is moving in.

Velocity, alternatively, in physics jargon includes course. For motion alongside a straight line, pace can be positive or adverse. For a given scenario, equivalent to Charlottesville to Richmond, we need to agree beforehand that one explicit path, resembling away from Charlottesville, counts as sure, so motion in opposition to Charlottesville would then always be at a detrimental velocity (but, of course, a positive speed, since velocity is all the time positive, or zero).

Uniform motion in a airplane

Now think about how you could describe quantitatively the motion of a smooth ball rolling continuously on a flat clean tabletop (so frictional effects are negligible, and we can take the speed to be consistent). Obviously, the first thing to specify is the speed---how rapid is it moving, say in meters per moment? But next, we have to tackle the way to give its course of motion, and simply positive or unfavourable would possibly not do, because it may well be moving at any perspective to the table edge.

One approach to describing uniform motion in the airplane is a kind of simplified version of Galileo's "compound motion" analysis of projectiles. One can recall to mind the motion of the ball rolling regularly around the table as being compounded of 2 motions, one a steady rolling parallel to the length of the desk, the other a gentle rolling parallel to the width of the table. For example, one may just say that in its secure motion the ball is continuing at a steady 4 meters in keeping with second alongside the length of the desk, and, at the identical time, it is proceeding at a velocity of 3 meters per moment parallel to the width of the table (it is a big desk!). To visualize what this means, think about where the ball is at some quick, then the place it's miles one moment later. It may have moved 4 meters alongside the size of the desk, and in addition 3 meters alongside the width. How far did it in reality move? And in what route?

We can see that if the ball's uniform motion is compounded of a gentle velocity of 4 meters in step with moment parallel to the size of the table and a gradual pace of three meters per second parallel to the width, as shown above, the true distance the ball strikes in one second is 5 meters (remembering Pythagoras' theorem, and specifically that a proper angled triangle with the two shorter facets Three and four has the longest side 5---we chose those numbers to make it easy). That is to say, the speed of the ball is Five meters in keeping with second.

What, exactly, is its velocity? As mentioned above, the velocity comprises each pace and path of motion. The most straightforward and most herbal way to constitute course is with an arrow. So, we represent pace by drawing an arrow in the airplane indicating the route the ball is rolling in. We can see at the above representation of a desk that that is the course of the slanting line arrow, which showed from the place to where the ball moved in a single moment, clearly within the path of its velocity. Hence, we constitute the route of the speed by drawing an arrow pointing in that course.

We can make the arrow constitute the speed, as neatly, by means of agreeing on a rule for its length, such as an arrow 1 cm lengthy corresponds to a pace of 1 meter consistent with second, one 2 cm lengthy represents 2 meters in step with moment, and so forth. These arrows are typically known as vectors.

Let us agree that we constitute velocities for the instant through arrows pointing in the route of motion, and an arrow 2 cm long corresponds to a velocity of one meter according to second. Then the speed of the ball, which is Five meters in keeping with second within the route of the slanting arrow above, is in reality represented quantitatively by means of that arrow, because it has the correct length---10 cms. Recalling that we started by way of pronouncing the ball had a velocity 4 meters in line with second parallel to the length of the desk, and 3 meters per moment parallel to the width, we notice from the determine that these particular person velocities, which should be added together to present the overall speed, can themselves be represented by arrows (or vectors), and, if truth be told, are represented through the horizontal and vertical arrows in the determine. All we are saying here's that the arrows appearing how a ways the ball strikes in a given course in one moment additionally represent its speed in that course, as a result of for uniform motion pace just means how a ways something moves in a single second.

The general speed of five meters in keeping with moment within the route of the dashed arrow can then be thought of as the sum of the 2 velocities of four meters per second parallel to the length and 3 meters in keeping with second parallel to the width. Of course, the speeds don't upload.

Staring at the determine, we see methods to upload those vectors is to position the tail of certainly one of them at the head of the opposite, then the sum is given through the vector from the opposite tail to the opposite head. In other words, putting the two vectors together to form two facets of a triangle with the arrows pointing around the triangle the similar method, the sum of them is represented via the 3rd aspect of the triangle, yet with the arrow pointing the other way.

Relative Velocities

As we shall see, relative velocities play the most important position in relativity, so it is important to have a clear understanding of this concept. As an instance, consider a kid working at Three meters in line with second (about 6 mph) in a train. The kid is operating parallel to the size of the teach, towards the front, and the educate is moving down the observe at 30 meters per moment. What is the kid's speed relative to the bottom? It is 33 meters according to moment in the route the train is shifting alongside the monitor (understand we always specify route for a velocity). To in reality nail this down, you must assume through simply how some distance the kid moves relative to the ground in one second---three meters nearer to the entrance of the teach, and the educate has lined 30 meters of ground.

A trickier point arises if the kid is working across the educate, from one facet to the opposite. (This run will most effective final about one second!) Again, how to in finding the kid's velocity relative to the ground is to visualize how much flooring the child covers in one second---three meters in the path around the track, from one side to the other, plus thirty meters within the direction along the monitor. To in finding the whole speed, we've got so as to add two velocities at right angles, the usage of the "head to tail" rule for including vectors. This is simply the same drawback because the ball rolling around the table at an angle discussed above, and we want to use Pythagoras' theorem to find the child's velocity relative to the ground.

Here is another instance of vector addition, this time the two vectors to be added are not perpendicular to one another, yet the same rules observe:

So within the diagram above, the 2 vectors on the left upload to give the vector on the proper. (We are simply the use of a dashed line for one in every of them so you'll see what's going on in the center, most often all vectors are represented via forged strains.) To get a little bit much less summary, this may represent relative pace in the following means: the massive arrow on the left may well be the rate at which an individual is swimming relative to water in a river, the little arrow is the velocity at which the river water is moving over the river mattress. then the vector sum of these two represents the rate of our swimmer relative to the river bed, which is what counts for in truth getting someplace!

Aristotle's Law of Horizontal Motion

We prohibit our considerations here to an object, akin to an oxcart, shifting in a horizontal aircraft. Aristotle would say (with some justification) that it strikes in the path it's being pushed (or pulled), and with a pace proportional to the force being implemented. Let us take into accounts that in the case of vectors. He is announcing that the magnitude of the velocity of the article is proportional to the applied power, and the direction of the speed is the path of the carried out drive. We see immediately that no longer handiest is the rate a vector, yet so is the implemented power! Of course, that is obvious really---the implemented drive for sure has magnitude (how laborious are we pushing?) and direction, and can be represented via an arrow (we would have to work out some gadgets of pressure if we would like the length to represent power quantitatively---we will come again to this later).

So Aristotle's rule for horizontal motion is: speed is proportional to applied drive, where each are vectors.

This rule turns out to paintings neatly for oxcarts, yet does not make a lot sense for our ball rolling throughout a clean desk, where, after the initial shove, there's no carried out drive within the course of motion.

Galileo's Law of Horizontal Motion

Galileo's Law of Horizontal Motion can also be deduced from his remark near the start of Fourth day in Two New Sciences,

Imagine any particle projected alongside a horizontal plane with out friction; then we all know ... that this particle will transfer alongside this same plane with a motion which is uniform and perpetual, supplied the aircraft has no limits.

So Galileo's rule for horizontal motion is: velocity = constant, equipped no power, together with friction, acts at the frame.

The giant advance from Aristotle here's Galileo's realization that friction is crucial part of what's going on. He knows that if there were no friction, the ball would stay at a gradual velocity. The explanation why Aristotle thought it was essential to use a pressure to handle consistent velocity used to be that he failed to identify the position of friction, and to realize that the power carried out to take care of constant velocity was just balancing the frictional loss. In distinction, Galileo discovered the friction acted as a drag power at the ball, and the external pressure essential to take care of constant motion simply balanced this frictional drag force, so there was once no total horizontal power at the ball.

Galileo's Law of Vertical Motion

As we have now already mentioned at length, Galileo's Law of Vertical Motion is:

For vertical motion: acceleration = constant (neglecting air resistance, and so forth.)

Describing Projectile Motion with Vectors

As an exercise in using vectors to represent velocities, believe the rate of a cannonball shot horizontally at 100 meters in step with second from the highest of a cliff: what's the speed after 1, 2, Three seconds? As standard, neglect air resistance.

The initial velocity is represented through a horizontal arrow, which we take to be 10 cms lengthy, for comfort:

------------------------------------------------------------------->

After one moment, the downward speed can have greater from zero to ten meters in keeping with second, as standard for a falling frame. Thus, to find the full pace after one moment, we want to upload to the initial velocity, the vector above, a vertically downward vector of size 1 cm, to provide the suitable scale:

It is worth noting that despite the fact that the velocity has visibly changed on this first moment, the rate has rarely changed at all---remember the speed is represented by means of the length of the slanting vector, which from Pythagoras' theorem is the sq. root of a hundred and one cms long, or about 10.05 cms, an excessively tiny change. The pace after two seconds would be given by adding two of the dashed downward arrows head-to-tail to the preliminary horizontal arrow, and so forth, so that after ten seconds, if the cliff have been high enough, the velocity could be pointing downwards at an attitude of 45 levels, and the speed by way of this point would have increased substantially.

Acceleration

Galileo defined naturally accelerated motion as downward motion through which speed greater at a steady fee, giving rise to units for acceleration that seem like a misprint, corresponding to 10 meters according to second in keeping with moment.

In everyday life, that is just what acceleration means---how fast one thing's picking up pace.

However, in physics jargon, acceleration (like velocity) has a more refined meaning: the acceleration of an object is its fee of trade of pace. From now on, this is what we mean once we say acceleration.

At first this may appear to you a nitpicking exchange of definition---but it is not. Remember pace is a vector. It can exchange without its size changing---it may just just swing round and level in a unique direction. This skill a frame can boost up with out replacing pace!

Why would we wish to outline acceleration in this type of nonintuitive means? It virtually turns out as if we are looking to make things difficult! It turns out that our new definition is what Galileo would possibly name the natural definition of acceleration. In the actual rules of motion that describe issues that happen in the universe, as we will discuss beneath, if a body has a net drive acting on it, it hurries up. But it does not necessarily trade speed---it might simply swing its speed around, in different phrases veer off in a special direction. Therefore, as we will see, this new definition of acceleration is what we need to describe the real global.

For motion in a directly line, our definition is equal to Galileo's---we agree, as an example, that the acceleration of a falling body is 10 meters in keeping with moment in keeping with second downwards.

Written material Copyright © Michael Fowler 1995 except the place in a different way famous.

NOTE: the next subjects coated within the path are the contributions of two very colorful characters, Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler. I gave a more whole account of these two and their works in an earlier version of this path. If you would like to read the extra complete (and extra interesting) model, click on Tycho Brahe.

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Index of Lectures and Overview of the Course

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